Chuckwagon: Potato Pie

from 1885 Farmer Almanac

    Boil on-quarter pound potatoes until soft, then peel them and rub them through a sieve.  Add one quart of milk, three teaspoonfuls of melted butter, four beaten eggs, and sugar and nutmeg to taste.  Bake as you would a custard pie.

*Courtesy of Chronicle of the Old West newspaper, for more click HERE.

Old West Book Review: Texas Ranger N.O. Reynolds

Texas Ranger N.O. ReynoldsParsons and Brice have chosen Texas Ranger (Nelson Orcelus) N.O. Reynolds not because he is well-known, but because he is deserving of recognition.  Reynolds was one of those brave, dedicated individuals who believed in justice, law and order.  He was willing to ride hard, shoot straight and suffer all of the hardships and dangers in a land filled with deadly intrigues.

Author Parsons has written numerous Western history books.  He was for seventeen years “The answer Man” for True West magazine, as well as editor for the Quarterly and Newsletter of the National Association for Outlaw and lawman History. (NOLA).

For writing this book, Parsons has partnered with native born Texan Donaly E. Brice, Senior Research Assistant of the Texas State Library and Archives Commission.  Brice has authored a number of books depicting Texas history.

Carefully researched, well-written, the biography of N.O. Reynolds is fast-paced reading about a man who served with the Texas Rangers, Company E, Frontier Battalion in various ranks for nearly five years.  During that time only one man, Tim McCarty was killed in Reynold’s command.  “Citizens of Texas wanted lawmen with courage and efficiency,” and they certainly got that with N.O. Reynolds.  He seemed always in the middle of things when it came to a variety of feuds and gunslinger escapades.  The Horrell-Higgins feud, Comanche raids, the Hoo Doo War, the transporting of Texas man-killer John Wesley Hardin, night rides, unruly lynch mobs, shootouts, ambushes, tracking thieves and killers, and capturing the Sam Bass gang were all part of Reynolds’ Job which he handled with steadfast efficiency.

In 1879, after nearly five years of service in Company E, Reynolds resigned from the Ranger Service citing health issues.  He had been a Texas Ranger since 1874.  At this time he went into the liquor business and bought property and ran a bar for a while but in 1880 he accepted a job as commander of Company D with the Texas Rangers.  However, he stalled taking the job citing trouble selling his business, and the job was filled by somebody else.

in 1882 Reynolds, at age 35, married the 20-year old Irene T. Nevill, the younger sister of one of his sergeants.  The couple married at the bride’s home in Austin.  They would have two daughters, Emma Elizabeth and Lula Jenkins.  Lula Jenkins Reynolds Blunt died of appendicitis when still a young woman; her early death was a great tragedy for the family

In 1883 Reynolds became City Marshal of Lampasas, Texas.  Here he was still a businessman, his name carne up periodically in newspapers as locals tattled on him for selling liquor on Sundays.

In 1888 to 1890 he was elected sheriff of Lampasas County.  He dealt with murder, mayhem and fence cutters.  Ranchers cut fences in desperation allowing their cattle to roam for grass and water during a hard drought.  Murder followed as desperate cattleman struggled over open rangeland vs private property.

Eventually Reynolds would move to the Gulf Coast of Texas where he worked in the shoe business.  According to newspaper advertising, within ten years he was back again in the liquor business.  Reynolds’ final employment was work as a night foreman at the Yellow Pine Paper Mill in Orange, one hundred miles east of Houston.  He remained here until his retirement in old age.  Reynolds died of pneumonia March 1, 1922.  His wife died in 1947, and the two rest side by side in the Center Point Cemetery where thirty-two Texas Rangers are buried.

In 1987 the Kerr County Historical Commission with the Center Point Sesquicentennial Committee sponsored a marker dedication honoring these men.  In addition, in 1999 a Texas Ranger memorial service sponsored by the Former Texas Ranger Association of San Antonio was held here honoring these brave men who rode, fought, and lived in a different time. Get your copy of this book HERE.

The reviewer, Phyllis Morreale-de la Garza is the author of numerous books about the Old West, including the true crime Death For Dinner, The Benders of (Old) Kansas, published by Silk Label Books, P. 0. Box 700, Unionville, New York, 10988-0700 www.silklabelbooks.com.

*Courtesy of Chronicle of the Old West newspaper, for more click HERE.

Chuckwagon: Sorghum Cake

   This was a dessert made either at the ranch or restaurants in town.  It couldn’t be made on the cattle drive because of the need for butter and eggs, two items that would not remain fresh during a three month cattle drive.

2 Tablespoons butter
½ Cup sugar
2 Eggs
1 Cup sorghum molasses
½ Cup water
½ Teaspoon baking soda
2 Cups flour

  Start by mixing the butter and sugar.  Then add the eggs.  In a separate bowl mix the molasses, water and baking soda.  Mix all the ingredients together.  Bake about 45 minutes at a 350 degree temperature.

*Courtesy of Chronicle of the Old West newspaper, for more click HERE.

Old West Book Review: Dragoons in Apacheland

Dragoons in Apacheland Dragoons in Apacheland details the fifteen years from 1846 through 1861 when the U.S. Army was engaged in dealing with the Apaches in southern New Mexico Territory. The conflicts and misunderstandings led to daily turmoil as the dragoons tried bringing peace and order to the region.

Deadly Apache raids, heat, dust, long marches in the desert, lack of decent food and shortages of equipment were only part of what the men were forced to put up with.  Army posts usually consisted of crude huts, shabby tents, harsh weather, sick horses and mules, and sometimes squadrons of mosquitoes.

Meanwhile, civilian leaders and politicians from Washington to the Territorial governors, lawmen and regional mayors only added to the confusion.  No one seemed to agree on how to handle this new land with its new problems.  At the same time, various Apache bands including Mescalero, Mimbres, Mogollon and Chiricahua fought to hold their ancestral homelands.  Indian raiding, kidnapping, horse and mule rustling and murder occurred regularly.  Some of these Indians took the blame for others, while a few wise old leaders like Mangas Coloradas tried to negotiate peace.  Mangas knew instinctively that the wave of white settlers would eventually wipe out the Apache bands by sheer numbers alone.  He held off the inevitable as long as he could.  The disputes raged endlessly between military men, Apaches, Mexicans, white settlers, and adventurers crossing the territory.

The author gives detailed accounts of the many skirmishes and battles between Apaches and the U. S. Military during those fifteen years prior to the Civil War.  Anyone doing research about the Apache Wars and what led up to the 1880s Indian Wars will find this a valuable source of information.  Readers will find this book a wonderfully detailed and accurate account of the pre-Civil War period in New Mexico Territory not often written about.  This time period seems to have been skimmed over until now, perhaps because people think of the Indian Wars having always to do with the names we are familiar with such as Geronimo, who came much later.

Kiser points out the Apaches presented an obstacle to those politicians, ranchers, farmers and businessmen working toward civilizing the new frontier.  Meanwhile, the Apaches driven from their land had good reasons of their own to offer resistance to those encroaching on their old way of life.  Both sides of the problem are presented here in careful detail, without taking sides.  The reader is given the opportunity to judge for his or herself what can happen when one civilization takes over another.

The book has maps showing the Chiricahua Apache homelands that extended from New Mexico (part of what is now southeastern Arizona) and far into Sonora, Mexico.  Eventually part of New Mexico Territory would split off and become Arizona Territory.  At the outbreak of the Civil War, the American troops were called back east for the horrific fighting about to begin. At that time New Mexico was not a priority for the United States government until the Civil War ended, and troops returned to the Western Frontier.

Carefully written and accurately documented, the author has gleaned his information from military records, U.S. government documents and publications, newspaper accounts and important books and papers on the subject.  Personally, he explains how when he was a child, his father took him to some sites of the old abandoned forts.  Here, sifting through the debris with a metal detector, he found a few precious mementos that piqued his interest to eventually write this book, an important addition to your Old West library. Be sure and get your copy HERE.

Editor’s Note:  The reviewer, Phyllis Morreale-de Ia Garza is the author of numerous books about the Old West, including Hell Horse Winter of the Apache Kid, published by Silk Label Books, P.O. Box 700, Unionville, New York, 10988-0700 www.sllklabeIbooks.com.

*Courtesy of Chronicle of the Old West newspaper, for more click HERE.

Chuckwagon: Cornmeal Pudding

3 Cups cornmeal mash
2 Tablespoons flour
5 Beaten eggs
½ Cup melted butter
1 Cup molasses
½ Cup milk
Juice and rind of 1 lemon

Stir altogether and bake ½ hour in a very moderate oven.
Serve with a sweet sauce.

*Courtesy of Chronicle of the Old West newspaper, for more click HERE.

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