Chuckwagon: Sourdough Cornbread

This recipe comes from the Hashknife Outfit of Winslow, Arizona.

1 cup starter.

Enough cornmeal to make a beatable batter.

1 ½ cups milk

2 tablespoons sugar

2 eggs beaten

¼ cup warm melted butter, or fat

½ teaspoon salt

½ teaspoon soda

      Mix starter, cornmeal, milk, eggs and stir thoroughly in large bowl.  Stir in melted butter, salt and soda.  Pour into a 10 inch greased frying pan or Dutch oven, and bake for 25 to 30 minutes.

*Courtesy of Chronicle of the Old West newspaper, for more click HERE.

Lost

This dandy little book is fun to read, easy to understand, and is chock full of ideas about hunting for lost treasure in Wyoming.

The author, W.C. Jameson has long been interested in searching for hidden loot, and when still a boy, helped cart gold bars out of the Guadalupe Mountains in Old Mexico.  Thus gold fever hit him hard.  Now Jameson writes books, conducts writer’s workshops, plays a guitar and sings his Western songs all across the United States.  I myself met Jameson in El Paso, Texas some years ago when he was the president of Western Writers of America.  Cordial, witty, and easy to like, wearing a beard and long Wyatt Earp coat, he helped aspiring writers find publication.  He was even instrumental in having the SPUR awards televised that year at the Camino Real on the Mexican border.

Inside this latest book readers will find 16 stories about lost treasure and how it came to be.  Some have to do with stagecoach robberies, holdups and bank shoot-outs that went wrong.  Others tell of gold nuggets glistening under the water of cold mountain streams.

Sometimes robbers hid the loot, only to be gunned down by local posses before they could tell the location of buried strong boxes.  Other individuals panned gold from creeks only to be murdered by Indians.  Some men found the gold all right, but were unable to carry it out of the hills and when they returned later with help, they became disoriented and never could pinpoint the location of the stash.

The idea of sinking a shovel into the earth, hitting a strongbox, and pulling up a million dollar bonanza is a fantasy to many of us, but some brave souls really do strike out with maps and shovels to try their luck.  Here you will find the Lost Cabin Gold Mine where rich men lost their lives to marauding Indians and the Snake River Pothole Gold where glistening nuggets lured men to their deaths. The Birdseye Stage Station Gold heist resulted in $30,000 in gold coins buried somewhere near the robbery site.  But who can find it now?

Indian raids, lost jade deposits, shoot-outs and the usual double-cross when gold is involved fill these pages.  Jameson makes the stories sound believable since he gives directions and information gleaned from original sources.  My particular favorite is the buried treasure of Nate Champion, whom I have always considered one of the heroes of the Johnson County Range War.  Nate Champion single-handedly held off a passel of hired Texas gunmen.  Alone inside his cabin, Champion kept a diary of what happened throughout that long day so those who found his body would know what happened there.  According to the Jameson account, Nate had a stash of gold buried outside the cabin his killers never found.

There is the story of Big Nose George Parrot who was not only the ugliest man alive, but a killer and gun-slinging outlaw reported to have buried $150,000 in stolen loot.  Of course George died with his lips sealed and his neck stretched by vigilantes.  The desecration of his body parts by the local doctor gets even worse as Parrot’s tanned hide became a pair of shoes, and the top of his skull an ashtray.  To this day folks still hunt in vain for poor Parrot’s buried treasure.

I suspect the sale of this book will provide more loot than might be found buried beside a burned-out cabin, but readers will have a grand time exploring these tales and who knows?  You might be the lucky one.

Jameson’s stories are always fun.  Sometimes his topics are controversial, like who is really buried in Billy the Kid’s grave.  You will have a good time reading his stories, but remember Jameson might just be pulling your leg.

Editor’s Note:  The Reviewer, Phyllis Morreale-de la Garza is the author of many published books about the Old West. Her most recent is a novel titled Hell Horse Winter of the Apache Kid published by Silk Label Books, P.O. Box 700, Unionville, New York 10988 Www. silklabelbooks.com.

*Courtesy of Chronicle of the Old West newspaper, for more click HERE.

Henry Brown, The Criminal Marshal

Henry Newton Brown was born in Missouri in 1857. Migrating west, he did some buffalo hunting. At the age of nineteen he ended up in Lincoln County, New Mexico during the time of the Lincoln County War. Brown became a member of the Regulators, the quasi-legal group led by Billy the Kid. After being involved in a couple of the shootouts, he was indicted for murder. Before warrants could be served, Brown took off to Texas.

Henry Brown didn’t smoke, drink or gamble. He frequently dressed in a suit, and he could handle a gun…the perfect candidate for a lawman. So, he was appointed deputy sheriff of Oldham County. Shortly afterward he went up to Caldwell, Kansas where he became deputy marshal. And when the city marshal resigned, Brown stepped into that position. Brown did so well that the citizens of Caldwell gave him a handsomely engraved Winchester rifle.
 
On April 30, 1884, after his third appointment as marshal, Henry Brown and his assistant, Ben Wheeler took a few days off to go up to Medicine Lodge, Kansas. The purpose of their trip wasn’t to get in a few days of rest, but to rob the Medicine Lodge bank. In the process Brown killed the bank president and Wheeler killed the cashier.
 
The men were captured and locked away in jail. However, that night a mob stormed the jail with ropes in hand. Henry Brown tried to escape. But before he could get far, a shotgun blast ended the whole affair. The people of the Old West could accept their lawmen having a criminal background, but not committing crimes while wearing a badge.

Wild Bill Hickok Kills Dave Tutt

In the early 1860’s two men of strong will, Dave Tutt and Wild Bill Hickok had a couple of meetings which ended in fist fights.
In 1865, working on the principal of “the third time’s a charm,” they met again. This time William Hickok, or Wild Bill Hickok, as he was now known, seemed to get along with Dave Tutt. Part of the reason could have been that Dave had his comely sister with him, and Wild Bill took a likin’ to her. Dave Tutt was doing much better financially than Wild Bill, and Dave loaned Bill money from time to time.

Now enters the wild card. A Susanna Moore came to town. Wild Bill had supposedly known her during before this. So Wild Bill started sparking her along with Dave Tutt’s sister. Susanna was not a woman to share her man, so she started flirting with Dave Tutt.
 
The whole affair came to a climax on July 20, 1865. Wild Bill Hickok was playing poker when Dave Tutt came up to him and grabbed his pocket watch that was lying on the table. Dave said it was payment for what Wild Bill owed him. Wild Bill allowed Dave to take the watch, but let it be known not to wear the watch in public.
 
The next morning Wild Bill saw Dave on the street wearing the pocket watch. With his pistol held at his side, Dave started walking toward Wild Bill. In response to a warning from Wild Bill, Dave shot off a round. Making sure he didn’t hit the pocket watch, Wild Bill shot Tutt through his heart.
 
Wild Bill learned that a person can’t play two fiddles at one time and make pretty music.
Wild Bill Hickok

 

Chuckwagon: Old West “Refrigeration”

In the 1800’s people in the West didn’t have a refrigerator or freezer to keep their meat fresh, so they used other means.  Below are summer guidelines for storing meat.  Incidentally, we don’t recommend your trying these methods today.  They are not that dependable.

Cover the meat with sour milk or buttermilk and store in a cellar.

In areas where the nights are cool, hang the meat in the open from a tree so any breeze can pass around it.  Make sure the meat is brought inside at dawn.  During the day wrap the meat in a tarp and store in a shady place.  Make sure the blow flies don’t deposit eggs on the meat.

Keep the meat away from rain and damp nights.  Any meat that gets wet must be cooked or jerked immediately.

*Courtesy of Chronicle of the Old West newspaper, for more click HERE.

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